Ten Things Your Mom Should Have Taught You About Toys

Ten Things Your Mom Should Have Taught You About Toys

Look for toys that nurture cross-generational play. Look for toys that your child can use as he develops and acts out stories. Your toddler is getting good at figuring out how object in her world work-like television remotes or light switches. Should your good friend’s children have adequate just one issue, they may not retain more. Board games encourage counting, matching, and memory skills, listening skills and self-control as children learn to follow the rules. They also nurture language and relationship-building skills. Pretend play builds language and literacy skills, problem-solving skills, and the ability to sequence put events in a logical order.

Look for toys that help your child practice current physical skills and develop new ones. Give your child the chance to play with “real” stuff-or toys that look like the real thing. She is also interested in playing with your “real” stuff, like your cell phone, because she is eager to be big and capable like you. Books, magnetic alphabet letters, and art supplies like markers, crayons, and fingerpaints help your child develop early writing and reading skills. Toys like this help children problem-solve, learn spatial relations how things fit together, and develop fine motor skills using the small muscles in the hands and fingers.

They also help children develop spatial relations skills understanding how things fit together, hand-eye coordination, and fine motor skills using the small muscles in the hands and fingers. Having a schedule is one of the most important things one should do. One need only look at the Purina One dog food ingredients to appreciate Purina’s commitment to superior quality. Look for toys that spark your child’s imagination. During your child’s third year, his creativity is taking off as he is now able to take on the role of someone else like a king and imagine that something like a block is super 18k toy something else like a piece of cake. “Real-life” props like take-out menus, catalogs, or magazines are fun for your child to look at and play with and  build familiarity with letters, text, and print.